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Orange Tip Butterfly

This mainly white-coloured butterfly gets its name from the orange markings on the wing tips. Of all British butterflies, only the male Orange Tip has this colouration, making it easy to recognise.

Orange Tips can be seen flying from April to June. They tend to frequent flowery meadows and woodland edges.

The caterpillar feeds on seed pods of plants of the Cabbage family but gardeners have nothing to fear. Cuckoo Flower (also known as Lady’s Smock) is their favourite food plant rather than allotment Cabbages!

Orange Tip Butterfly

 

Song Thrush

Since the 1970s the number of Song Thrushes has fallen dramatically (by over 70% in places). The bird remains fairly common in public parks and private gardens, although there have been declines in these habitats too.

A healthy Song Thrush population benefits gardeners because the birds help to keep down the numbers of slugs and snails. Song Thrushes can, however, be poisoned by slug pellets and worm-killing chemicals so gardeners that care for wildlife should consider using only environmentally-friendly methods of pest control.

Song Thrush

 

Bluebell

Wild Bluebells are found in some western European countries but it is only in Britain that large ‘carpets’ of Bluebells can be seen.

Bluebells are mainly thought of as woodland plants but you may come across them in other situations, such as in hedgebanks or even in open grassland. The presence of Bluebell carpets can be an indicator of undisturbed habitats that may be very rich in other plant and animal species.

Bluebell

 

Brown Hare

Brown Hare

The Brown Hare can be distinguished from the Rabbit by its larger ears (with their black tips) and its longer legs. Unlike the Rabbit, the Hare does not burrow and (outside the brief mating season in spring) is generally solitary.

Brown Hares will dig themselves shallow scrapes, called "forms", in the ground where they may rest during the day.

Brown Hares may have been brought to this country by the Romans. They are now widespread and fairly common inhabitants of arable farmland and upland pastures.
Numbers of Brown Hares have fallen nationally since the 1960s and they seem to have disappeared entirely from some areas of the county within the last fifteen years.

 

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